Skip to content

Mother Nature Network Applauds Flatbush Community Supported Agriculture

August 25, 2009

CSA aims for affordability

A community supported agriculture program in Brooklyn offers memberships based on income, opening the door to those previously shut out.

With community supported agriculture program memberships often running $600 or more per share, it can be difficult or impossible for those with less flexible budgets to participate. A new CSA in Brooklyn is addressing that problem, offering sliding scale memberships based on income and flexible payment plans. A share can cost as little as $100, which can be paid in food stamps.

Flatbush Farm Share is named after the racially, ethnically and economically diverse Brooklyn neighborhood where it operates. Renee Razzano, the membership coordinator, says she helped start the CSA because she “believe[s] intensely in the importance of local and fresh foods for individual health and for the health of a community. It is critical that low-income and working-class people have access to whole, local, fresh foods.” She points out that most CSAs in New York City are not oriented toward low income or working class people.

Through a CSA, individuals or households may buy a share of produce for a season from a nearby farm. Joining a CSA directly supports local farms, reduces the pollution caused by long-distance transportation of produce, and gives families nutritious food to eat.
“I personally was concerned about the inconsistency we foodies are always talking about — that being a foodie is a luxury of the better off,” says general coordinator and initiator Amy Seek. “Though all people need to eat, often in lower-income communities it is difficult to access healthy food.”
“Thanks to Just Food, New York City Coalition against Hunger, and our funders, we have subsidies that allow us to provide shares at levels anyone can afford. The only difficulty we have now is getting the word out.”
Seek came up with the idea for Flatbush Farm Share after attending a meeting that she had thought would be about general food justice issues, but was actually for CSA core group leaders. “It dawned on me several days later that I could start a CSA and use it as an experiment in creating a system that would accommodate all income levels,” she says. “Thanks to Just Food, New York City Coalition against Hunger, and our funders, we have subsidies that allow us to provide shares at levels anyone can afford. The only difficulty we have now is getting the word out.”
To read the full article, click here.
Advertisements
No comments yet

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: